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The author presents a repeating pattern: At first, returners are welcomed and encouraged with food, only to be rejected as the dangerous downside begins to emerge. Detailed accounts of efforts to outline solutions, and also of such often-overlooked consequences of this pattern as roadkill, supplement this deeply conflicted overall picture. An eye-opening take on how romantic sentimentalism about nature can have destructive consequences. There was a problem adding your email address. Please try again. Be the first to discover new talent! Each week, our editors select the one author and one book they believe to be most worthy of your attention and highlight them in our Pro Connect email alert.

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Reservations are non-refundable. If you wish to reserve or purchase a book or books in advance, please visit Zimmara or call Most programs held in the Bayard Henry Long Room on the Athenaeum's first floor are amplified and assistive listening devices are available for patron use.

Search form. The best parts are the middle chapters, featuring Sterba's fascinating research on several now-overabundant backyard species -- namely deer, geese, beaver, bear and turkey. Sterba reveals that many populations are now semi-feral, neither wholly wild nor comfortably for us domestic.

Nature Wars - Sterba, Jim - | HPB

This leads to a refreshing perspective: We can no longer afford a man vs nature, or "progress" vs romantic wildness dichotomy; instead, we need to become enlightened horticulturalists, wise stewards, and in some case The best parts are the middle chapters, featuring Sterba's fascinating research on several now-overabundant backyard species -- namely deer, geese, beaver, bear and turkey. This leads to a refreshing perspective: We can no longer afford a man vs nature, or "progress" vs romantic wildness dichotomy; instead, we need to become enlightened horticulturalists, wise stewards, and in some cases practioners of wild - animal husbandry.

Although outside this book's purview, this paradigm shift will also be needed to manage and adapt to climate change. This hybrid view complements an astonishing, counterintuitive fact: American forests east of the Mississippi have regrown in abundance following our historical rapacious clearing and industrial despoilment. Sterba is largely an enjoyable, informative narrator. There are a few hints of fogeyism and kids-these-days nostalgia here and there, but Sterba keeps it in check, letting his hard-earned facts and fascinating research carry the story.

Sterba is a career reporter and that discipline shows through. Critiques of sentimental animal-rights partisans were welcomed by me. However, there was one point about landscape ecology I wish he had made more strongly: that the regrown forest and abundant suburban fauna doesn't necessarily signify healthy ecosystems. The landscape is now fragmented and there are several threatened species for every over abundant one. Plus, many vegetation communities will probably never recover; e. I'm sure Sterba understands this, but chose not emphasize this point as it may have taken him too far afield, so to speak.

The problem is that less well informed readers could come away thinking that, because wild turkeys and deer bounced back, ecological restoration and conservation aren't needed after all. Feb 11, Marissa rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction. I consider myself to be an animal lover. Grew up in an old farm town that gradually became Suburbia. Had a bird feeder and lots of woods in the backyard where i grew up lots of great memories tramping around the woods as a kid.

Nature Wars: The Incredible Story of How Wildlife Comebacks Turned Backyards Into Battlegrounds

Raised a bunch of rabbits, cats and now a dog. I volunteered with various animal rescues and am mostly vegetarian. Grew up opposed to hunting and animal testing and now oppose factory farming. As an adult, I helped spread the word about trap and neuter programs. All that I consider myself to be an animal lover. All that being said, this book was eye opening for me. Not too long ago I had to stop and consider my opposition to hunting. I was opposed to it for sport but I can't argue with the logic of feeding hungry people and now the sad truth that wild caught animals are healthier than factory farmed animals.

Perhaps because I had come to these conclusions before I picked up this book, it made me more open minded about it, or perhaps because it is researched so well.

I can't argue with his logic and can't help but find a bit of myself in every story of conflict and managed to learn so much more about what is happening, the politics of population control, and the dangerous false messages created by those who would save every life without realizing the actual costs involved in the decisions. I found myself questioning a lot more of my default beliefs and that makes this a great book to me.

Dec 15, Elizabeth rated it did not like it Shelves: natural-history. I was super disappointed in this book. I thought it would be about human and wildlife conflicts in suburbia and the different methods to mitigate those conflicts. Instead the first portion was all about the deforestation of the Northeast and then the subsequent regrowth of the forest.

All fine and dandy but kinda boring. He chooses 5 species. There is a lot of natural history and then a lot of how we killed off everything. Then he talks at length about ho I was super disappointed in this book. Then he talks at length about how we are disconnected from nature and anthropomorphize too much. Then he talks about killing them again.


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Repeat this formula for each species. I was hoping he would talk about all of the various methods to mitigate conflict. Literally his only solution is to kill them all. If you are antihunting you are really stupid. Mostly he talks about roadkill, birdfeeders and feral cats.

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Super disappointing. I really didn't like the condescending tone that the author took towards his reader. I felt like he was calling everyone stupid. Jan 08, Hapzydeco rated it liked it. Fact-based analysis of a fascinating 21st century conundrum. Jun 25, Rohan Arthur rated it liked it. Sterba takes on the increasingly vexed problem of human-wildlife conflict in the US attempting to get to its roots. His journalistic approach is both entertaining and frustratingly shallow. He describes well the growth of the urban sprawl and the gradual rewilding of America that sets the stage for this conflict.

Yet, when he tries to attribute reasons for conflict he finds much to blame - perhaps to much. It is difficult to deny that an increasingly 'denatured' demography, grown up on a diet of Sterba takes on the increasingly vexed problem of human-wildlife conflict in the US attempting to get to its roots. It is difficult to deny that an increasingly 'denatured' demography, grown up on a diet of faux nature served up by Disney, Discovery and doggies-in-the window find themselves in a troubled, warped relationship with anything truly feral.

Sterba believes his own farm upbringing - decapitating chickens and eating the family cow - was a much healthier way to engage with animals, guts and feathers and dung. It is hard to argue that there is something profoundly irritating about the naive conflation of ecological integrity, environmental protection, habitat conservation and animal rights. Yet Sterba's arguments sound just a tad partisan when he sides with the game hunters as an 'elegant' solution to the problems posed by the wild species that have taken over American backyards.

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Sterba is able to point fingers at every other lobby group - pet owners, humane societies, conservationists - except the game hunters for whom he has a special regard. Sterba's analysis makes for an interesting but ultimately unfulfilling thesis. Feb 08, Ellen rated it liked it Shelves: nook , book-group. This is a well-researched and interesting presentation on how man's actions of the course of America's history from the Pilgrims to present day have affected the way wildlife populations have decreased and then increased again in areas of this country.

The author spent many years traveling around and investigating different animal population shifts as man's intrusion first de--forested, then re-forested areas. He makes the point that most places are now in a re-forestation state as farm land tha This is a well-researched and interesting presentation on how man's actions of the course of America's history from the Pilgrims to present day have affected the way wildlife populations have decreased and then increased again in areas of this country.

He makes the point that most places are now in a re-forestation state as farm land that was de-forested is being abandoned and is going back to a forested state. Suburban and outward sprawl also has planned landscaping that also invites wild animals to become backyard guests that some people deliberately welcome and others don't.

http://1stclass-ltd.com/wp-content/accessing/ Conservationists have gotten it wrong, thinking early on that their attempts to re-introduce and re-build populations of near extinct or endangered species were helping. Often done for the sportsman who wanted to hunt, populations became too large and out of control. Sterba highlights white tail deer, black bear, Canada geese, beavers, and wild turkeys.

He referred often to experts in conservation fields, academia, sport hunting, and citizen groups contending with local invasive wildlife issues. He often used his 's childhood on a Michigan farm as an example of how animals, especially pets, should be viewed. I found this a bit off-putting. Otherwise it was very readable, and presented good points, but no easy solutions. Feb 21, Warreni rated it really liked it. Sterba makes a compelling case for us to re-examine both our attitudes toward the concept of wilderness and our well-intentioned but often misguided approaches to amateur wildlife management.

The book starts by recounting the history of human exploitation of American forests and their eventual but poorly-recognized recovery. It goes on to discuss the problem fauna such as beavers, deer, and geese that have seen explosive population growth and a concomitant increase in conflicts with humans. Fina Sterba makes a compelling case for us to re-examine both our attitudes toward the concept of wilderness and our well-intentioned but often misguided approaches to amateur wildlife management.

Finally, the book discusses issues surrounding amateur wildlife management--people manipulating animal populations through seemingly-innocuous activities such as feeding stray cats or installing backyard bird-feeders.